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StarCruiser
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Joined: 13 Dec 2004
Posts: 264
Location: Houston, we have a problem...

PostPosted: Mon Aug 19, 2019 5:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

On the Dutch Destroyers - they appear to follow typical practice on the main guns - hull color. AAA might be hull color or maybe bare metal (for machine guns).
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Mikee
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Location: Oakland, CA

PostPosted: Fri Aug 23, 2019 3:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the information, Star Cruiser.

When I submitted my message, the computer didn't seem to enter it, so I thought it hadn't gone through. I was surprised to see it in the Forum when I o0ened it up today.

Question regarding that programmers mantra attached to your emails - is it a modification of a mantra that was in the first "Dune" movie, or did the movie copy & modify he mantra you're posing? [/quote][/list][/code]
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StarCruiser
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Joined: 13 Dec 2004
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Location: Houston, we have a problem...

PostPosted: Sat Aug 24, 2019 1:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yep - the computer programming community latched onto that right off! I believe it first reared it's ugly head around 1985 - about a year after the David Lynch movie.
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Donald M. Scheef
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Joined: 24 Jun 2006
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Location: Waukegan, Illinois USA

PostPosted: Sat Aug 31, 2019 8:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

UK Destroyer Leaders
Between 1929 and 1945 (a 16-year span) the UK produced 28 lettered classes of destroyers: “A,” “B,” “C,” “D,” “E,” “F,” “G,” “H,” “I,” “J,” “K,” “L,” “M,” “N,” “O,” “P,” “Q,” “R,” “S,” “T,” “U,” “V,” “W,” “Z,” “Ca,” “Ch,” Co,” and “Cr.” Most of these had eight ships. The “C” class had only four ships (mostly due to economic reasons, but justified as a peace measure.) Nine of these classes (“A” through “I”) had a separate ninth ship (fifth in the case of “C” class) as a ‘flotilla leader.’ For three of these classes (“B,” “C,” and “D”) the flotilla leader was almost identical to the other ships in the class, differing only in internal fittings and enlargement of superstructure. In the “A,” “E,” “F,” “G,” “H,” and “I” classes, the flotilla leader was visibly larger (longer, greater displacement, additional 4.7-inch gun mount) than the other ships. The leaders were all named for famous British naval commanders. These were:
• “A” class – Codrington (Admiral Sir Edward Codrington was at the Battles of Trafalgar and commanded the British fleet at the Battle of Navarino) – Don’t ask why the Brits couldn’t come up with a famous commander whose name started with “A.” A brief search just for Admirals comes up with Adam, Affleck, Alexander, Allen, Almyer, Alpin, Anson, Arbuthnot, Arbuthnott, Austen, and Ayscough. Likewise for “B” and “C.”
• “B” class – Keith (Admiral the Honourable Sir George Keith Elphinstone) was active during the American War of Independence and the Napoleonic Wars, with several exceptional performances)
• “C” class – Kempenfelt (Richard Kempenfelt commanded the victorious British forces at the Second Battle of Ushant. He was known as an innovator, especially of the British Naval signaling system)
• “D” class – Duncan (Admiral Adam Duncan, 1st Viscount Duncan of Camperdown, hero of the Battle of Camperdown)
• “E” class – Exmouth (Admiral Sir Edward Pellew, 1st Viscount Exmouth, was active during the American War of Independence, the French Revolutionary Wars, and the Napoleonic Wars.)
• “F” class – Faulknor (any one of a number of naval officers in the Faulknor family, including Jonathan Faulknor, who was active during the American War of Independence, the French Revolutionary Wars, and the Napoleonic Wars.)
• “G” class – Grenville (probably Sir Richard Grenville, who was active at the time of the Spanish Armada. Several other notable military persons had the same surname.)
• “H” class – Hardy (Vice Admiral Sir Thomas Masterman Hardy, captain of HMS Victory at the Battle of Trafalgar.)
• “I” class – Inglefield (Admiral Sir Edward Augustus Inglefield, a noted explorer of the western America coast.)
Most of the other classes had one of the eight ships “fitted as a leader” but for the most part this was limited to internal modifications. These leaders were visually indistinguishable from the rest of their class in 1/2400-scale.
HMS Codrington displaced 1540 tons standard and was 343’ oa compared to the “A” class ships, which displaced about 1350 tons standard and were 323’ oa. She carried 5 single 4.7”/45 QF Mk IX guns and 2x4 21” TT. The other “A” class ships carried only four single 4.7” guns. Shortly before being sunk in 1940, HMS Codrington had the aft set of torpedo tubes replaced by a 3” anti-aircraft gun
HMS Keith was considered the flotilla leader for the “B” class. This ship had the same dimensions and armament as the other “B” class ships but a slightly greater displacement due to enlarged superstructure. Likewise, HMS Kempenfelt for “C” class and HMS Duncan for “D” class.
HMS Exmouth and HMS Faulkner displaced about 1480 tons standard and were 343’ oa compared to the “E” and “F” class ships which displaced about 1380 tons standard and were 329’ oa. The leaders carried five single 4.7”/45 QF Mk IX guns and 2x4 21” TT. The “E” and “F” class ships carried only four single 4.7” guns. HMS Exmouth was lost early in WWII. During the war, HMS Faulknor replaced one of the 4.7” guns with a 3” anti-aircraft gun.
HMS Grenville displaced about 1455 tons standard and was 330’ oa compared to the “G” class ships which displaced about 1350 tons standard and were 323’ oa. Grenville carried five single 4.7”/45 QF Mk IX guns and 2x4 21” TT. The “G” class ships carried only four single 4.7” guns. HMS Grenville was lost early in WWII.
HMS Hardy displaced about 1455 tons standard and was 337’ oa compared to the “H” class ships which displaced about 1350 tons and were 323’ oa. Hardy carried five single 4.7”/45 QF Mk IX guns and 2x4 21” TT. The “H” class ships carried only four single 4.7” guns. HMS Hardy was lost early in WWII.
HMS Inglefield displaced about 1544 tons standard and was 337’ oa compared to the “I” class ships which displaced about 1350 tons and were 323’ oa. Inglefield carried five single 4.7”/45 QF Mk IX guns and, originally, 2x5 21” TT. The quintuple torpedo tube mountings turned out to be too heavy and were converted to quadruple mounts. The “I” class ships carried only four single 4.7” guns. War-time modifications to Inglefield included replacing one of the 4.7” guns with a 3” anti-aircraft gun.
Considerations for modelling:
• HMS Codrington, HMS Exmouth, and HMS Faulknor were similar enough that a single model would suffice for all three, as built. Hypothetically, I would also have identical flotilla leaders for “B,” “C,” and “D” classes. Separate models would be needed for late-war Codrington (one bank of TT replaced by 3” anti-aircraft gun) and for late-war Faulknor (one 4.7” gun replaced by 3” anti-aircraft gun).
• HMS Grenville was unique in being shorter than all the other flotilla leaders. For hypothetical purposes, I would accept using a longer HMS Hardy/HMS Inglefield for HMS Grenville.
• HMS Hardy and HMS Inglefield had identical dimensions. The quintuple torpedo mounts on Inglefield were converted to match those on Hardy before the start of the war, so a single model for both (with quadruple torpedo mounts) would be fine.
Overall model wants, with priorities:
1. Model for HMS Codrington, HMS Exmouth, or HMS Faulknor, as built. I would get two packs of three ships to provide flotilla leaders for “A” through “F” classes.
2. Model for HMS Hardy or HMS Inglefield, as built. I would get two packs of three ships to provided flotilla leaders for “G” through “I” classes plus eight similar ships built for Turkey and Brazil but taken over by the British at the start of the war.
3. Model for HMS Faulknor, late-war. I would get one packs of three ships to provide leaders for hypothetical late-war survivors of “A” through “F” classes that remained as destroyers.
4. Model for HMS Inglefield, mid-war. I would get one pack of three ships to provide leaders for hypothetical late-war survivors of “G” through “I” classes that remained as destroyers.
5. Not really interested in a model for HMS Grenville, unless no model for HMS Hardy or HMS Inglefield is available, in which case I would use HMS Grenville for all three.
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ww2navyguy
E5


Joined: 29 Jul 2005
Posts: 210
Location: Sunny Florida

PostPosted: Sun Sep 01, 2019 6:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great info on the British DD leaders! Look forward to GHQ producing models just as you laid out possble pack variants. I think I would purchase the same kits you listed. Thanks again for this info and hope GHQ can produce them in near future. Wink
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dougeagle
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Joined: 22 Mar 2006
Posts: 725
Location: Northern Alberta

PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2019 1:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some nice looking ships on here for sure
I've taken a dive into WWII naval wargaming lately, a set of rules that are quick and fun, which is just right for my two boys, 9 and 7...and for myself as well.

I'm looking at getting the British carrier CV Illustrious. Wondering what the length and width are for the GHQ ship?
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Donald M. Scheef
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Joined: 24 Jun 2006
Posts: 1518
Location: Waukegan, Illinois USA

PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2019 4:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't have the GHQ model but GHQ usually is pretty good at getting the scaling right.
The Illustrious had an overall length of 753ft 3in, which scales to 3.77 inches (9.58 cm). The waterline beam was 96ft 9in, which scales to 048 in or 1.21 cm. Note, however that the actual width of the ship would be significantly greater because of the flare and overhang.

Don S.
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regia-marina
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Joined: 19 Mar 2005
Posts: 128
Location: Medford, Oregon

PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2019 5:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome aboard to naval war gaming! Great to hear that you are doing this with your boys. Which rules are you using?
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dougeagle
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Joined: 22 Mar 2006
Posts: 725
Location: Northern Alberta

PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2019 9:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Donald M. Scheef wrote:
I don't have the GHQ model but GHQ usually is pretty good at getting the scaling right.
The Illustrious had an overall length of 753ft 3in, which scales to 3.77 inches (9.58 cm). The waterline beam was 96ft 9in, which scales to 048 in or 1.21 cm. Note, however that the actual width of the ship would be significantly greater because of the flare and overhang.

Don S.


Okay. Probably closer to the size of the GHQ Renown or Repulse then I'm guessing, both of which are close to that size, Repulse being around 4" mark.

regia-marina wrote:
Welcome aboard to naval war gaming! Great to hear that you are doing this with your boys. Which rules are you using?


Thanks. I've had a few Italian and British ships for a few years. It wasn't up until a few months ago that my oldest boy saw them as I was inventorying my 6mm WWII German, Soviets and British/Canadian troops. He was curious about playing them, so went looking for an easy gaming system that was also fast. Found 'Find, Fix and Strike' on the Wargame Vault. Very enjoyable for the younger ones. A couple of small battles, no more than 2 ships per side.
I've recently picked up a few more Italian ships, some British cruisers and transports. Once those are completed, will be looking at some aircraft for Germany and Italy for bombing raids on the British Convoy towards Malta or Crete Very Happy
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Donald M. Scheef
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Joined: 24 Jun 2006
Posts: 1518
Location: Waukegan, Illinois USA

PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2019 9:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Renown and Repulse were 794 ft overall with 90 ft beam at the waterline. This scales to 3.97 inches (10.08 cm) by 0.45 in (1.14 cm).
Illustrious is about 5% shorter and about 6% greater in beam. In general "about the same size."

Don S.
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something-something and you'll see
you'll avoid catastrophe."
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rct75001
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Joined: 11 Dec 2004
Posts: 159
Location: Sydney, Australia

PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2019 2:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I’m looking to some hints / help please.

I have just started to put together my first WWI micronauts to paint. But I am finding the masts to be very problematic. Easily bent and the, almost impossible to straighten on,y to bend again at a slight knock.

Do others replace them and is so with what and any tips?

Thanks a lot.
Richard
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rct75001
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Joined: 11 Dec 2004
Posts: 159
Location: Sydney, Australia

PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2019 2:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I’m looking to some hints / help please.

I have just started to put together my first WWI micronauts to paint. But I am finding the masts to be very problematic. Easily bent and the, almost impossible to straighten on,y to bend again at a slight knock.

Do others replace them and is so with what and any tips?

Thanks a lot.
Richard
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regia-marina
E5


Joined: 19 Mar 2005
Posts: 128
Location: Medford, Oregon

PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2019 2:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rct75001 wrote:
I’m looking to some hints / help please.

I have just started to put together my first WWI micronauts to paint. But I am finding the masts to be very problematic. Easily bent and the, almost impossible to straighten on,y to bend again at a slight knock.

Do others replace them and is so with what and any tips?

Thanks a lot.
Richard

I use a pair of tweezers to straighten them out. It works well. However, some of my ships I've had for 30 years and the masts have broken after so much straightening. I have replaced those masts with plastic from the sprues of old model kits. I heat it with a candle and pull it apart to the desired thickness. It has worked well and looks good too.
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Mikee
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Joined: 07 Sep 2007
Posts: 121
Location: Oakland, CA

PostPosted: Tue Nov 19, 2019 2:49 pm    Post subject: scout plane colors Reply with quote

I'm still working on my Gneisenau. I'll have to put the scout plane on this ship (I usually don't put those uncivilized weapons on my ships). What were the airplane colors?

I'm also considering modifying two of the Soviet BBs to make them look a little different. Primarily by using different cranes, but I've also been thinking of putting a scout plane on the third turret of one of the BBs, if I can clean off tte AA guns on two of the turrets. (My plans are based on drwings in Breyer's book on the worlds' battleships.) What colors did the Soviets use on their naval scout planes?
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Mikee
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Joined: 07 Sep 2007
Posts: 121
Location: Oakland, CA

PostPosted: Tue Nov 19, 2019 2:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rct75001:

I use a pair of spade-headed tweezers to straighten out my masts. I think Micro-mark sells them, although I've had my pair for so long that I don't remember where I got them. The spade-shaped heads ar smooth, and are great for straightening out small things like masts, gun barrels, etc.
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