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How to paint microarmor
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WHM
E5


Joined: 29 Mar 2005
Posts: 176
Location: Central N.J.

PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2006 3:23 pm    Post subject: How to paint microarmor Reply with quote

Yeah, you're right! There are a number of post, sites, etc.. explaining how to do this, but for us less skilled questions remain!

Specifically, when using a airbrush to camoflage the vehicle, how do you then drybrush the vehicle?

Steps that I have been able to divine is first to prime the model, then apply the base coat, apply wash, airbrush the camo., then drybrush. The question is what color is used to drybrush and dosen't the color, assuming its the base color we are drybrushing, dosen't it cover the camo? Also, is the drybrush color thinned or is it lightened such as Ritter describes in his steps? Floorwax?

Regarding the wash, black seems to be universal is it also used when using camo? I have used it with my mono color vehicles, but for some reason it dosen't leave the shadows desired in the effect, but "dirities" the vehicle instead. I have tried to dilute it more but the results are not the best. In fact is the wash brushed on or is it dabbed into the recesses?

What I aim to do is Syrian armor for the October War.

Don't ask me details about the airbrush, its a Badger. It was free (from my Dad) and worth it to try it as opposed to spending $160 for a new and fancy one!

Thanks.
My experience has been in
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Hauptmann6
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Joined: 05 Jan 2005
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2006 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www3.telus.net/Ritterkrieg/

His method works REALLY well.
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WHM
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2006 11:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've seen his site and printed out the pages, but he uses enamels and I acrylics. Did try enamels but had some problems so have stuck with acrylics.

I use water in place of turpentine logic being if a step requires the paint to be thinned then the correct medium would then be water.

What is not clear is when drybrushing what color is used, the base color or the camo color and does it overshadow the color beneath?

Anybody get good results w/acrylics?
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1ComOpsCtr
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Joined: 13 Apr 2006
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2006 12:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Before you apply cammo you need to finish the base color by drybrushing with a lighter value of the same basic color.

What color primer do you use? Basic tan, or brown, or black?

Syrian Armor might be best primed with a medium to dark brown, but black will do if you don't want to take the trouble to find brown primer. After priming dry brush at least two successively lighter colors, with the first dry brush application being as close to the true color you want to represent (as well as the first color being applied a little heavier). The second dry brush color should be about 25% lighter than the base color and should not cover the first dry brushing completely. This will give you your basic shadows and light... After the base color is finished you should paint the cammo. You can carefully highlight the cammo with a lighter version of the same color just touched(with a brush) to specific areas of the vehicle which you will have to figure out for yourself based on how you want the finished product to look... Experiment!

After the cammo you should "dust" the vehicle using a color as close as possible to what the dust in the area you are gaming (this color is usually a light tan, yellow brown, to an almost white, depending on where in the world you are trying to simulate). If you are gaming (duplicating) an area where there is lots of mud you should mud the tracks and wheels before you dust a vehicle since the mud is usually a little darker than dust... and you want the dust to be the last thing you apply, even after decals, if you are applying some.

You can dust the vehicle with a brush or with the airbrush, again through experimentation as to the effect you want to achieve...

Oh, I almost forgot, you could paint the base color (spray paint like armor dark yellow or some other standard color with your airbrush using enamel), apply a darkening agent as you noted the black wash does to the whole vehicle, and go back(after thorough drying) over the darkened paint with the original color by drybrushing. After that coat has dried you can drybrush again with the 25% lighter coat, which will achieve the same shadow and light as above.

You usually need to experiment with a vehicle or two before you know what looks best.

Will
ComOpsCtr
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Mk 1
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Joined: 23 Dec 2004
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2006 6:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
WHM said:
I've seen his site and printed out the pages, but he uses enamels and I acrylics. Did try enamels but had some problems so have stuck with acrylics.

I use water in place of turpentine logic being if a step requires the paint to be thinned then the correct medium would then be water.

What is not clear is when drybrushing what color is used, the base color or the camo color and does it overshadow the color beneath?

Anybody get good results w/acrylics?

I use a lot of acrylics. I have a fair collection of Polly-S and Tamiya paints. I also use enamels, including Testor's (basic) and Testor's Model Master. I will very often use a variety of acrylics and enamels on one model.

I follow the Ritter method pretty closely, with only modest adjustments to my own tastes. (Note that the Ritter method is very different from the method 1ComOps describes).

The basic steps I follow are:
1) Prime
2) Base coat
3) Camo
4) Wash
5) Detail
6) Dry brush

My most common painting is with a white spray primer (most often Testors Model Master now, though I prefer Floquil when I can find it). Then a Model Master enamel spray-on base coat. After that, most of the detailing and weathering are done with acrylics.

If I am doing camo with acrylics, I do that next.

Then I do the wet washing. It takes a bit of practice and experimentation to get right. Still, I have stuck with Ritter's basic method.

I have found several detailed techniques that help keep me happy with my Ritter-style washes.

I use the plastic off of GHQ blister packs as my paint pallette. I fill up one buble about 1/2 way with water. Then I touch my paint brush to the tip of a dishsoap bottle and stir it into the water to break the surface tension. Then I dip the paint brush into black or dark brown paint, pull it out, and stir it into the water. Repeat the dip one more time. That's it. Two dips to a half-full bubble of water.

Then I wash it all over the whole model. No saving any part. Completely wet, top to bottom. Move on and do the same to the next. After I've done this to about five models, I go back to the first. Judging the timing on this is important. I want the wash to be starting to dry, but not yet dry. Kind of sticky wet. Then I "beat it up" with a flat-headed redsable brush (just like Ritter says to!). Whish, whish, whish. Left-right left-right. Rotate the model a bit. Left-right, left-right. Rotate a bit more. etc. Once you've done a full rotation of the model, go on to the next.

It feels like you are completely painting your models black. Then like you are taking off all of the wash you just put on them. You'll wonder why you're doing all that, just to get back to where you started. But ... when you're done, you'll see that there is still some shadowing left in the recesses, and the whole thing looks a bit dirty. That's what you wanted to achieve. However, as a result the model may look a little darker now. That's OK, for the moment.

Then on to detailing, mostly with Polly-S acrylics. Tracks I do in "Grimy Black" or "Oily Black" if they are rubber-tracked (U.S.), or in Tamiya "Bare Gunmetal" if metal (Soviet, Italian). I prefer Polly-S "Oxidized Aluminum" for metal tracks, but I can't find it anymore. Tires should also be done with "Grimy Black" or "Oily Black" (I did my Italians with "Night Black", and now regret it. Too black.)

More and more often now I am using razor-point markers for camo or detailing. I have green, brown, blue, yellow, red, and black. Much of the detailing on my Italians shown a few weeks ago in the "Show Us Yer Stuff" thread, such as the camo on the AB41 armored cars and the insignias on the Macchi C.200 fighters, were done with pens.

One thing I have discovered, though, is that if I am using the pens, I have to do my overall wash first. The "beating up while it is sticky" phase makes a mess of the penned-on inks. Experience has shown me that I should wash first, then camo, if using the pens.

Very much in the details now, but I have also discovered that if I want to make the camo look "soft-edged" like an airbrush can do, I can achieve some of that affect by using the pens, and then doing a clear-water wash. But don't beat it up, just put the water on, and let it dry.

Now some detail washes. Grillworks get a wash of black that is not so heavily diluted (maybe 5 dips of the brush for a half-bubble of water), and tracks get a particularly sloppy wash of Polly-S "Rust" that is only diluted about 2-to-1 by water (always using that dab of dishsoap). Sloppy in that I wind up washing all over the running gear in the process. Then I dab the running gear a little with a sable brush to wick away the excess.

Next is dry-brushing. I use Polly-S acrylics. The idea is to use a lighter shade than the base-coat.

This can be done by taking the base color (or a near approximate if you've changed brands between base coat and dry brushing, like I do), and mixing it with 2 parts base color, 1 part white and 1 part yellow, or some similar mix. Experiment a bit to find a mix you like.

In my case I seldom mix for dry brushing. I have chosen a few ready-to-use colors instead. I use Polly-S "Sahara Sand" for dry brushing over Forrest Green (Soviet) or Olive Green (U.S.) vehicles. It is a light green/beige color. Works fine for my purpose. I use Polly-S "U.S. Khaki" for dry-brushing brown vehicles or "Soviet Khaki" infantry. It is a brown-tinted tan. I use "Flesh" for my Afrika Mustard colored vehicles (like my Italian tanks).

I use a long, fairly bushy brush. Dip it fully in the paint. Put it on a cloth or paper towel, fold the cloth/towel over it, and press/squeeze out all the paint you can. Once.

Then brush the model all over with very light strokes, with particular attention to areas with greater detail (bolts, rails, grills). Some models more, some models less. Go a little light on large unfeatured surfaces or rounded surfaces. Adjust to taste.

Yes, you do cover up some of the base coat. But mostly on the raised surfaces/features. So they become more visible. The occasions when you also get some showing on an unfeatured flat surface just wind up making it look dusty. That's OK. It makes the model look a little lighter overall. Kind of re-balancing it from the slightely darker state it was at after the wash.

Sometimes I will also do a dry brushing of silver over the tracks. Or not. I haven't yet decided whether I like that step enough to make it a regular event.

For infantry, I change the order a little. It becomes:

1) Prime
2) Base coat
3) Dry brush
4) Detail
5) Wash

It's fun. Takes practice. Takes some experimenting. But it's fun. The results are kind of like magic. 'Cause it looks so cool. So you'll want to run around and show the results to the wife, the kids, the neighbors, anyone you can corner.

Don't. They won't understand. Instead, take some piccies, and post 'em here. We're here for you, to help you work through this issue -- the sorry lack of appreciation of your art. We appreciate it. Really, we do. Show us some more.

Wink
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CountRingworm



Joined: 30 Jun 2006
Posts: 59
Location: Des Moines, IA

PostPosted: Thu Aug 17, 2006 6:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mark 1-

thanks for the tips- i'm just getting into this myself (did my first 5 stugs, they came out OK, i think. i'll post them later when i'm completely done). still working on some infantry, and your method seems similar to IanH's http://www.iandrea.co.uk/wargames/6mm/6mmf/6mmf.html. does that look pretty close? i'm trying to get ideas on how to do these guys, i've never worked with things this small.
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Ritter
E5


Joined: 22 Nov 2004
Posts: 529
Location: BC, Canada

PostPosted: Thu Aug 17, 2006 12:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="Mk 1"]
Quote:
WHM said:
It's fun. Takes practice. Takes some experimenting. But it's fun. The results are kind of like magic. 'Cause it looks so cool. So you'll want to run around and show the results to the wife, the kids, the neighbors, anyone you can corner.

Don't. They won't understand. Instead, take some piccies, and post 'em here. We're here for you, to help you work through this issue -- the sorry lack of appreciation of your art. We appreciate it. Really, we do. Show us some more.

Wink


Too funny - Well put Mk1!

Troy
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Rusty



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PostPosted: Thu Aug 17, 2006 1:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

great tips, added to bookmark thanks guys Very Happy
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WHM
E5


Joined: 29 Mar 2005
Posts: 176
Location: Central N.J.

PostPosted: Thu Aug 17, 2006 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My method has been to follow Ritter's directions but with acyrlics.

I never primed the figures because I did read once since they were so small the primer combined with the thickness of the paint would hide the details. But you cqan't argue with success, he said prime so I prime. I went to Home Depot and got a can of cheap white spray and have used that.

I baked the models, but didn't seem to be any different then some unbaked ones so that needs to be decided on whether to continue that step.

Regarding mixing, I would apportion the paint and water to thin by counting the drops by using a eye dropper. Seemed like a good idea.

As for beating the model to get the wash into the recesses, he uses turpentine I used water. The capillary action of the wash going into the recesses, well sometimes it worked and other times, not. I would end up "painting" the wash as opposed to dabbing. On the back deck grills dabbing would be OK, but as for the raised portions of the turret, such as the gun mantlet where it is the only raised portion of the turret on what is a fairly smooth surface I would "paint" along the edges to get the shadow effect. What would happen is the surface would have at best can best be called brush strokes of wash.

ARRRRRGGGGGHHHH!!!

I would thrown the model in a coffe can of thinner to strip the paint, scrub it under running water with a old tooth brush and start again. I got to tell you some were painted five times over befor saying to hell wth it.

I have seen first class paint jobs on very poorly done terrain and at other times its the other way around, but for the guys who are palying it never seemed to matter.
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DrBig
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Joined: 22 Jun 2006
Posts: 227
Location: California

PostPosted: Thu Aug 17, 2006 2:46 pm    Post subject: Re: How to paint microarmor Reply with quote

[quote="WHM"]
What I aim to do is Syrian armor for the October War.

[/quote]

Syrians used two types of colors.

The older stuff (T-55's, BTR-152's, etc.) would be solid post war medium olive green.

The newer stuff BMP's, T-62's, etc, would be the dark green with sand & gray camo
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Thunder
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 17, 2006 2:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I use black fine point sharpies to color rubber tires. I like the look and semi-gloss effect.
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WHM
E5


Joined: 29 Mar 2005
Posts: 176
Location: Central N.J.

PostPosted: Thu Aug 17, 2006 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How about that?

Just went back to Ritter's site and noticed a forum there, Missed that before.

There was a thread asking questions along the same lines I was with one about using water in place of turpentine since acrylics were being used as opposed to enamels.

The poster said to use spraybrush thinner instead of water.

Would paint thinner do?

Has anyone mixed acyrlic paint with thinner and what were the results?
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av8rmongo
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 17, 2006 3:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not sure if it helps but Tamiya makes an acrylic thinner.

Paul
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DrBig
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 17, 2006 4:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

when people black wash with a water based wash, they usually add 'flow-aid' to reduce the viscosity. There are several recipes out there
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Mk 1
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Joined: 23 Dec 2004
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 17, 2006 7:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
CountRingworm opined:
...still working on some infantry, and your method seems similar to IanH's http://www.iandrea.co.uk/wargames/6mm/6mmf/6mmf.html. does that look pretty close? i'm trying to get ideas on how to do these guys, i've never worked with things this small.


Indeed! I would say I am probably closer to IanH than to Troy on the infantry.

This is only a recent development for me. While on this forum, I have experimented with a couple techniques. I tried using rubbing alcohol instead of water for diluting my washes ... I've gone back to water. I learned the dab of dishsoap here (to break the surface tension of water), and I'm sticking with that one. It's good and simple.

I only switched the order around on the infantry (dry brush early, wash late) with my most recent units (Italians). I really liked the way it worked out. I have some trouble keeping track of which thing to do when ... I like the washing and dry brushing, and I'm always in a rush to get to them (why I play Russians? Razz ). Gotta constantly try to remind myself when to do which step. Get it wrong probably half the time, and wind up going back to re-paint tracks that were done before the dry-brushing instead of after, etc.

So what? Do some painting. Have some fun. Try some variations. Post some pictures. We're waiting! Get to it!
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